Author Topic: Time Exposure shots  (Read 2780 times)

WrongMain

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2012, 01:43:44 AM »
Maybe this will help.  Set your F-stop at least 5.6, F8 would be better.  If you set the focus at infinity with those F stops, your subject should be in focus.  It also looks like you need to get closer to your subject.  The light coming from the crossing gates tends to disperse, spread out over distance.  It will also be aggravated if it's not a clear night.  Any atmospheric condition will soften the lights, making them look like they're out of focus.  Be sure to use a remote trigger or cable release.  And if there's any wind at all, try to stand where it won't affect the camera.  Time exposure photography is a learning process, and kind of like a crap shoot.  Good luck and don't give up. :)
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Racecar52

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2012, 08:59:05 AM »
Here's the problem: Canon, and it's loveliness, forgot to put the numbers on the lenses. The only thing the lenses have are the markings for the millimeters. That's it.

You can still figure out which way to turn the focus ring to focus closer or farther.  Just shift it to as far as possible.  The example you used above would definitely qualify as 'infinite focus'


And just to claify SemperVaporo and WrongMain are saying the same thing.  F-stops and aperture means the same.
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sataraid1

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2012, 10:34:48 AM »
Time exposure photography is a learning process, and kind of like a crap shoot.  Good luck and don't give up. :)

Yes, and revel in the fact that you can play all you want without having to wait two weeks to see the results, which end up going in the trash anyway!

While the importance of camera stability IS important, I still don't think it's the primary issue here. You've got to remember that while your exposure is indeed long, your moving point of light (the locomotive) is traveling through the frame, perhaps rapidly. It's in one location in the frame only for a split-second, therefore you would see evidence of camera motion *when it occurred*, rather than throughout the entire exposure. Motion blur would show up as a pronounced irregularity at one particular point in the trail. If there was a sudden bump in the trail, you'd know the camera had been jolted. *But even that would not have made the trail less sharp if it were in focus.* It would simply mean a change in the direction of the trail for the moment it was moving. If the trail was sharp, then suddenly fuzzy for a short time, then sharp again, you'd know there was some vibration for a short time rather than a jolt.

Motion is almost always evidenced by distortions on a particular axis of movement ... left to right, up and down. Sometimes even "swirls". When you poke a camera on a tripod, it moves in the direction you poke it, then "bounces" back and forth on the same axis.

What's more, I'd wager the scene was entirely dark when you tripped the shutter, so even if you'd really whacked it one, there wouldn't have been enough time for even the slightest amount of light to register on the sensor for the few milliseconds the camera was vibrating.

I'm not disputing any of the advice being given above. It's all good advice, and any of it can have a pronounced effect on your image. I'm just saying that I think focus is your issue here, rather than motion, based on what I see in the image.

As for how to get correct focus ... go there during the day, focus during normal light, and mark the barrel of the lens and the location of your tripod. When you set up later, I assure you the few feet of potential error won't matter at distances like the one in your sample above. Or just throw a white towel over your camera, grab a book, and wait for the sun to go down. I've done both!

sataraid1

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2012, 10:39:14 AM »
Oh, and something else I just remembered ... if you're serious about taking night shots, if you have any kind of filter on your lens, remove it. Reflections between the filter and the front element of the lens will cause an upside-down "ghost" image of bright points of light.

shane_man15

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2012, 11:03:59 AM »
Oh, and something else I just remembered ... if you're serious about taking night shots, if you have any kind of filter on your lens, remove it. Reflections between the filter and the front element of the lens will cause an upside-down "ghost" image of bright points of light.
When people talk about filters, I'm completely lost.   ???

If anyone has seen the kit you can buy from Sams Club that comes with the Canon EOS Rebel T3, I'm pretty sure it comes with no filters, but I'm still lost on them. Time to do homework on filters! (as if this college kid doesn't already have enough. ::))
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CIOR

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2012, 11:38:24 AM »
When people talk about filters, I'm completely lost.   ???

If anyone has seen the kit you can buy from Sams Club that comes with the Canon EOS Rebel T3, I'm pretty sure it comes with no filters, but I'm still lost on them. Time to do homework on filters! (as if this college kid doesn't already have enough. ::))

They screw on the front of the lens.  They have many types of filters, and I'm betting you do not have any. 

shane_man15

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Re: Time-Lapse shots
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2012, 03:02:57 PM »
They screw on the front of the lens.  They have many types of filters, and I'm betting you do not have any. 
No. I don't have anything like that. Didn't receive anything like that anyways.
Shane Smiley (shane_man15)

Modeler of the Muncie, Richmond, and Fernald Railway.
Train horns are also my thing.

GIMME A CORVETTE ALREADY!