Author Topic: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana  (Read 1239 times)

Railroadspike

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Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« on: September 14, 2010, 05:46:43 PM »
I was checkin out the ol SPV map yesterday for the Western part of Indiana and I saw that there was a spur that lead into Mansfield and Ferndale. Looks like the line ended in Ferndale. Was this part of the Interurban or was there actually freight traffic that went that way? The only traffic I could think of being freight coming out of there is maybe either wood or livestock. As for interurban...That would make a lot of sense as well. If anyone has any info Id love to hear about it. My girlfriend lives in Mansfield and I drive though there all the time. I looked for some kind of ROW yesterday, but was unable to find anything remotely close to that. I love any info! Thanks guys!
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BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2010, 08:08:01 PM »
Was MONON?, but for details will have find the info from years ago. 

indrr

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2010, 09:01:18 PM »
I believe the line through Bridgeton was the Central Indiana line down to Brazil.

I don't think Ferndale had any railroad.

FYI, the closest interurban was the Indianapolis-Terre Haute line through Greencastle and Brazil.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2010, 06:25:15 AM by indrr »
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BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2010, 11:09:23 PM »
Not the source I had in mind, but the following is basically the same;
Source:  A county history bulletin  and also on page 74 in Ghost RR of Indiana has full details.
MONON project as I had thought, sold to the contractor, then sold to the Chicago & South Eastern.

The Fort Wayne, Terre Haute & Southwestern incorporated by the MONON in 1890.
Between Bridgeton and Mansfield, to reach Coal fields and stone.
Business ended in 1894, railroad removed in 1899.   

Railroadspike

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2010, 09:25:57 AM »
Awesome! Thanks for the info. Much appreciated. I don't think Im going to find much of a ROW since the line was removed over 111 years ago. Would be nice to find something, but it is very doubtful...
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CIC-CEI-CAS

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2010, 07:31:54 PM »
This may be related.... During my CA&S research, I found the Chicago and Indiana Coal RR had a branch from Coal Bluff to a small mining community named Diamond.  The Central Indiana also served Diamond from the north. Looking at the SPV railroad atlas, it looks like this branch may have connected from the southeast near Bridgeton as well. I wonder if this could some how figure in???
Jim Thomas - Kokomo

BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2010, 07:50:28 PM »
I do not have anything on the CA&S. Most of my research has been for PRR and NYC property titles and never included the CA&S so far.
This is all interesting to me.
I have a lot of info on the Coal Mines up to the 1920's, so I will check if any comments on the RRs in the area.   

BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2010, 07:50:13 AM »
I should completely read articles instead of "spot" reading;
In The Ghost RR of Ind, read the whole chapter on the Central  Indiana.  If you do not have this book, most libraries do.

The Chicago & South Eastern was (later) the Central Indiana.
 "indrr" was right about the line through Bridgeton being the Central Indiana, which this line connected to.

The Chicago & South Eastern was sold to the Big Four (NYC) and the PRR, Sept 1, 1902.

Quote page 58;  "The Central Indiana Railway Company was incorporated March 16, 1903, and on March 19 the two Railroads entered into an agreement for the joint operation of the Central Indiana"   

Ferndale??

indrr

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2010, 08:32:00 AM »
Again, from Ghost Railroads, the line from Bridgeton to Mansfield was started by the president of the Monon, but never really got going, and operated with a converted steam tractor.

Ferndale I think is east of Mansfield.  There is a Ferndale Road over that direction.
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Railfan407

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2010, 04:40:34 PM »
This would be an excellent question for my 83 year old grandfather.  He grew up in Carbon in the coalfields around there.  Of course the railroad was gone then but he might remember remnants.

speedyd

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2010, 09:06:26 PM »
You can still see the old row in Bridgeton.
High & Dry Line

BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2010, 01:50:33 AM »
Source:  Indiana History Bulletin  Vol 4, Extra #4  August 1927.  Page 30.
Quote:
                                                                                    Mansfield Mills
 About 1892 the Fort Wayne,Terre Haute, and Southwestern Railroad Company built a short section of road for the purpose of shipping red stone quarried near Mansfield.  The track was but a few feet from the front entrance of the mill. Since this was a great disadvantage to the milling property and business, the railroad company finally bought the mill to settle the matter.  The road failed to meet its obligations, abandoned its property, and the mill reverted (back to it's owners). 

Railfan407

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2010, 12:28:43 PM »
I wonder why the mill couldn't benefit from having rail service right out it's front door?   ???

Nickinak

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2010, 01:53:50 PM »
Possibly the locomotives were a problem with the horse deliveries or fire hazard from sparks.

BantaRail

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Re: Mansfield and Ferndale Indiana
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2010, 06:52:54 AM »
Source:  "Mansfield, It's More Than A Mill"  1983, Copyright. Page 20.
I DO NOT know how accurate this info is, but quoted as printed.
                                               Mansfield - Carbon Railroad
  There was a period of one year in 1890, to be exact when 12 miles of railroad between Mansfield and Carbon, Indiana, belonged to four enterprising men who formed its crew, its board of directors, its business agents and its superintendency.
  The four are Fred Wimer, owner of a single factory along the 12 mile stretch, A.O. Benson, W.N. Benson, and E.P. Reynolds - the contractor who built this stretch of railroad.
  The history of this railroad starts before 1890 when a project was set forth by the MONON railroad to build a connection between Bainbridge and Terre Haute.  This was to be built in 12 mile sections by various contactors.
  When the E. P. Reynolds Company of Rock Island, Illinois started construction on  the Mansfield - Carbon stretch trouble began.  The MONON experienced financial trouble and decided to drop the Mansfield-Carbon stretch which was nearly completed.
  E. P. Reynolds was left with 12 miles of track on his hands and nobody claimed to own it, so with the enterprise of a giant, he took the road on himself.  For a year he and the three others ran it and made money.
  Their locomotive was an old steam traction engine.  It was christened "Nancy Hanks" after the then famous race horse.  The freight cars were three old stone trucks, then called "Larry Cars".  These were attached to the front of the engine, since the engine could only push the cars and make any headway.  The weeds grew up so fast between each daily trip that the engine could not possibly go first on the tracks and pull the cars.
   The train made a trip from Mansfield to Carbon every day, sometimes making an extra trip if someone had some merchandise or stone to haul.  They charged $5.00 a load for hauling the stone.  And the old rattling train made from 12 to 15 miles an hour on its precarious trips.
   The crew of this train used to run in all weather.  At one time a washout of a bridge on the Big Raccoon Creek, across which the tracks passed, made it seem exceedingly dangerous to attempt to cross naturally.  Only the tracks crossed the stream, with the regular supports horizontal beneath; for the entire piling which had been built to hold up the road had been swept away by the surging waters !  The crew tried it and got across without a mishap, and continued to cross day after day, carrying loads of stone.
    This staunch old locomotive was the mainstay of travel and freight hauling for the farmers, business men and pleasure seekers between Mansfield and Carbon, Indiana in 1890.           
     
(Banta Note: There is two photos, one shows the locomotive; a 0-4-0 flat car with a boiler on it.
 Looks like the first Locos built in the 1820s-30s)
 I am always on the search for info related to any post. !!!!!!!!