Author Topic: Claypool Indiana  (Read 1322 times)

Gary_Berkey

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Claypool Indiana
« on: December 05, 2005, 04:31:12 PM »
If you're a Norfolk Southern railfan, check out Claypool, Indiana. It's a good place to watch/photo/film NS freights on the Fort Wayne-Chicago Chicago District and the Goshen-Anderson Marion Branch. Both rail lines cross each other at grade. There's a town street which runs along the west side of the Marion Branch.You can stand or park on this street, it's public property on or along this street, there's a playground just west of Railroad St., you can also park along the edge of this street near the playground property fence.This street dead-ends on either side of a former grade crossing on the Chicago District, so you shouldn't have any major street traffic worries. Stay off NS property at/near the diamonds and keep away from a nearby NS office trailer that's located along Railroad St. close to the Marion Branch.I have parked here countless times for over 11 years and have seen numerous intermodals, including RoadRailer trains as well as coal and merchandise trains. On the Marion Branch, general merchandise trains rule the day, with  occasional special trains like the recent FEMA trains, aggregate trains and a grain train every once in a while. The town of Claypool is approximately 8/10 miles south of Warsaw, approximately 3/5 miles north of Silver Lake on State Rd. 15. On State Rd. 15, at the overpass over the Chicago District, take the county road towards the east towards town, approximately 1 mile, till you get to Railroad St., then turn right(south), keep driving till you get to the former grade crossing near the diamonds.
                     

GP30M4216

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Re: Claypool Indiana
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2005, 05:15:20 PM »
Hi Gary-
I know from Goshen down at least as far south as Warsaw, the Marion Secondary has former PRR position light signals.  Do these continue does as far as Claypool?  What sort of signals are on the Fort Wayne line, and about how many trains a day would you say?  This Fort Wayne line is former Erie trackage, correct?
« Last Edit: December 31, 2006, 01:27:48 AM by indrr »

Kim_Heusel

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Re: Claypool Indiana
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2005, 09:20:12 AM »
The position light signals continue at least to Wabash for sure and possibly farther. Back in my Manchester College days they were in place to Marion, but I don't know much about the line south of there. I thought I read somewhere that some of the signals south of Wasash may have been replaced, but I'm not sure of that. The east-west NS line is not former EL, it is the former Nickel Plate mainline that ran from Chicago to Buffalo via Fort Wayne. The EL, which ran farther south through Akron and Rochester is now abandoned for the most part.

Gary_Berkey

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Re: Claypool Indiana
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2005, 03:49:56 PM »
The position-light signals go down to the north side of Wabash; in the city itself and south of this city, interestingly, Norfolk Southern replaced these signals with round back plates or targets with tri-color lights in a triangular position, similar to the former New York Central signals on the NS Chicago Line.I've have seen these newer signals on the Marion Branch from Wabash down to Alexandria; i was told NS installed these signals in the late summer/early fall of 1999, soon after the break-up of Conrail.The rail line known as the Fort Wayne Line is usually refered to the former Pennsylvania Railroad line which also connects Fort Wayne with Chicago; it goes via Columbia City, Warsaw and Plymouth, it's north of the former Nickel Plate line Kim and i refer to.Conrail titled this PRR right-of-way the Fort Wayne Line.The Erie-Lackawanna line is south of the NS former Nickel Plate line(the Chicago District) and like Kim said, is abandoned and pulled up except for a couple short segments used for local industry and around a mile of track purchased in North Judson, Indiana by The Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum. As far as train frequency,the Marion Branch sees at least 10/12 trains a day; the Chicago District closer to 25/30 trains a day. Hope this helps you out some, Gary.