Author Topic: IR and telegraph?  (Read 1118 times)

jsaviator

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 5
IR and telegraph?
« on: November 17, 2017, 07:13:35 PM »
Question-- did the Indiana Railroad have telegraph operators? Curious, because I asked the same thing on a Pacific Electric page on Facebook, and was surprised to find that they did. Usual for interurbans?

rrnut282

  • Mogul
  • *****
  • Posts: 2115
  • I'm a Hoosier Railfan!
Re: IR and telegraph?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2017, 08:03:08 AM »
It's not too surprising.  How else would they communicate in the era before telephones were common?  They also had dispatchers to to change locations of meets when one car was late, just like the steam roads. 
rrnut2-8-2
(Mike)

jsaviator

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 5
Re: IR and telegraph?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 10:12:17 AM »
True... I'm talking about a time well past the advent of telephones-- quite a few Class A railroads used telegraphy up until the mid- to late- 50s, because (with a bit of truth in it) it was said that telegraphy was faster :o   The telephone was used as well, for clarification or other circumstances. So, I suppose my question *should* have been: *if* the IR had telegraphers, where, when, and how specifically did they function in daily operations (train orders, OS reports, etc)? Anyone with knowledge of this   ???

Ed Kyle

  • Conductor
  • ****
  • Posts: 152
Re: IR and telegraph?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 11:57:41 AM »
This message describes the telephone as the primary means of dispatcher/crew communication on an Indiana Railroad predecessor.  It's always been my understanding that crews carried telephone handsets with a jack plug or used dedicated lineside telephone boxes.  Telegraph may have been used for other needs, I'm guessing.

https://indianarailroads.org/board/index.php?topic=170.msg657#msg657

 - Ed Kyle

jsaviator

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 5
Re: IR and telegraph?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2017, 04:22:33 PM »
Thanks for the information! I also came across another page ( https://mysite.du.edu/~jcalvert/railway/interop.htm ) which, as titled, described "how interurbans operated", and mentions in spots the Public Service Co. of Indiana and Union Traction Company of Indiana. It basically backs up the post you referenced, with motormen in direct contact with dispatchers. It goes on to describe accidents which occurred, and specifically mentions UTC accidents on 22 March 1912 at Fortville, on 13 June 1919 at Carmel, on 2 February 1924 at Ingalls, and on 16 November 1926 at Bell (as well as an accident at Clay on the E&OV on 7 September 1927), and why they occurred. Interesting reading... the point made is that with the lack of a double-check on dispatcher orders (as fulfilled by the station telegraph operators on Class A lines), there was a greater likelihood of human error.

Rick

  • Mogul
  • *****
  • Posts: 2969
  • Conrail #1
Re: IR and telegraph?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2017, 08:41:18 PM »
This message describes the telephone as the primary means of dispatcher/crew communication on an Indiana Railroad predecessor.  It's always been my understanding that crews carried telephone handsets with a jack plug or used dedicated lineside telephone boxes.  Telegraph may have been used for other needs, I'm guessing.

https://indianarailroads.org/board/index.php?topic=170.msg657#msg657

 - Ed Kyle
You can still see quite a few of these phone boxes along railroads today.  There’s got to be 2 dozen or more on the NS mains to Chicago.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk