Author Topic: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W  (Read 15674 times)

rbarcus

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2009, 10:59:56 AM »
Needless to say, the Erie right-of-way was (and still is, in some places) and impressive sight. It must have been a true engineering marvel back in its day.

I think the Erie had a number of trestles along their entire line in Indiana with most of them being backfilled.  If I remember correctly, when the locals in Delong were digging out the huge fills there, they supposedly uncovered parts of a trestle. There's a picture of one of these trestles near Hulbert, Indiana that was eventually backfilled on the HVRM website: http://hvrm.railfan.net/historical/099_Hulbert.jpg
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CIOR

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2009, 11:14:53 AM »
Mike, those fills and grade work are west of Huntington and east of Rochester. 

I'd read someplace that the dirt was brought in from western New York and Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio as needed.  There was a website that talked about this, but when I just googled it I can't find it (never bookmarked it apparently)

rrnut282

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #42 on: October 23, 2009, 01:38:50 PM »
Needless to say, the Erie right-of-way was (and still is, in some places) and impressive sight. It must have been a true engineering marvel back in its day.

I think the Erie had a number of trestles along their entire line in Indiana with most of them being backfilled.  If I remember correctly, when the locals in Delong were digging out the huge fills there, they supposedly uncovered parts of a trestle. There's a picture of one of these trestles near Hulbert, Indiana that was eventually backfilled on the HVRM website: http://hvrm.railfan.net/historical/099_Hulbert.jpg
That's one expensive way to build a railroad.  If they went to that much effort and expense, it should have been dead flat across Indiana.  Conversely, it should have had a very low cost to operate.
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robert_b1

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #43 on: October 27, 2009, 11:55:33 AM »
That makes sense. My guess is Conrail pulled the diamond and provided service with locals on both ends, and then had to put the diamond back in. As a side point, does anybody know why the Pennsy tracks are so widely seperated in the above photo?

Another photo of double-tracked PRR southeast of Kouts (between N. Judson and Winamac)...

http://hvrm.railfan.net/historical/027_Ripley.html
Quote
Ripley, Indiana, located on the Pennsy between Winamac and North Judson, is now just a wide spot in the road. In busier times several passengers are waiting for the train. Also shown are cars on the team track, stock chutes, gravel platforms and waiting shelter. Ripley must not have rated a full size depot. Check out the forerunner to today's hi-rail trucks next to the shelter. Today, everything is gone, including the tracks. Postcard from Bob Albert collection.

CSX_CO

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #44 on: October 27, 2009, 06:20:37 PM »
That's one expensive way to build a railroad.  If they went to that much effort and expense, it should have been dead flat across Indiana.  Conversely, it should have had a very low cost to operate.

No railroad is 'dead' flat for any real distance.  The New York and Chicago Air Line was going to attempt this (nearly flat ROW), and its efforts petered out around Westville, IN because of the cost.

The upper midwest is very flat compared to most areas.  We can thank the last  ice age for that.  However, there are large "escarpments" that surround the Great Lakes that mark the former shore lines of these lakes following the last ice age.  So, while Indiana is generally flat, its not without its gentle grades.  The nice thing about these grades is how gentle they are.  It lends itself to long fills and cuts to keep a gentle profile for the railroad.

These fills are expensive and when building a railroad, you just want to get it done.  You can come back later and build it to better standards.  Just look at the transcontinental railroad in the late 1860's.  Track looks terrible as they initially laid it.  They came back later and added ballast, etc.

Long tressels weren't uncommon back then.  The railroads would come back in and fill it in later, after traffic had started.  Garrett, IN was originally built on tressels over the swamp that underlays the town.  Supposedly, the B&O came in and dumped coal trains for fill and whatever garbage they had laying around.  To this day, if you dig a hole in Garrett, you'll find cinders, coal, and garbage from the construction.  I believe the first Horse Shoe Curve near Altoona was a large tressel that was later filled in across the valley.

Practice Safe CSX

rrnut282

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2009, 07:53:09 AM »
CSX CO

I wish there was a sarcasm icon.  I would have used it on dead flat comment.  I've surveyed and built a few rail lines and know that it is easier said than done.
rrnut2-8-2
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NWChicagoRailfan

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #46 on: February 10, 2010, 07:13:33 PM »
Does anyone have pictures of the Erie RR bridge across the Kankakee?  Google Earth shows it still being up as of 2005.

CIOR

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2010, 04:31:46 PM »
This was sent to me....

Just an observation, but compare the photos and landscape between these two links.  I believe its the same location, the dark overhead bridge in the background and telephone poles are evident in both photo links, just very different periods of time.
 
http://hvrm.railfan.net/historical/erie_disko.jpg

LJ

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #48 on: March 31, 2010, 08:30:38 PM »
I'll have to check, I thought that at one time I may have took photo's of it.

wolfeden

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #49 on: April 12, 2010, 10:14:55 PM »
Does anyone have pictures of the Erie RR bridge across the Kankakee?  Google Earth shows it still being up as of 2005.

The Erie Bridge is still over the Kankakee as of last weekend. One thing I would like to add is this area was known as Lomax, Indiana. There was a petroleum pumping station there for a good many years. Most of the buildings are still standing and the property is for sale. The trestle bridge photo shows a storage take on the East bank. Some of these older photos were from the Starke County Historical Society. The one photo that has us baffled is the Watchman's/tower? in the 1913 photo. Why and what was it used for??

hibbard

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #50 on: April 12, 2010, 10:56:58 PM »
Notice the switch going to the left. 1913 is in the time frame when the Erie was being double tracked. This may have been a temporary end of double track and this is a temporary block station. I have seen one other picture of this tower somewhere.

Bob

k9fon

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #51 on: December 19, 2010, 11:57:43 PM »
I know when the underpass was built in Garrett they pumped some water out and wound up making a sink hole on the west end of the yards!

KD9GLW

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #52 on: February 21, 2016, 04:38:47 PM »
Here's a few pictures I took along the old Erie west of Monterey, Indiana several years ago when the JK Line was still intact. I believe these were taken just before the line was abandoned. Sorry for the poor quality - I didn't have a very good camera at the time.

1. Looking west from a grade crossing towards the Tippecanoe River Bridge.
2. Looking up at the Tippecanoe River Bridge from the riverbank.
3. Looking east across the bridge towards Monterey.
4. Looking east from a grade crossing towards Monterey (you can barely see the grain elevator in the distance).

Is there any chance the old ROW could be reactivated for museum use? Last I heard it was railbanked.

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IU_Tower

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Re: Erie Lackawanna R-O-W
« Reply #53 on: February 22, 2016, 11:39:27 PM »
In the 2005 aerial, what looks to be a perfectly round foundation is still visible. Could this be where the oil tank was?